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Moving Beyond Pure Disaster Recovery
How to Pull Through with Business Continuity Plans

Ken Horner

The worst term in any IT-related scenario is without a doubt, "downtime." The constant threat of impending security breaches continue to arise day after day with the potential to create mass destruction in the functioning of organizations. Therefore, it is imperative for organizations to not only have a disaster recovery plan in place for the aftermath, but to also implement a business continuity strategy to aid in the complete avoidance of these IT dangers all together.

Enterprises Need to Have Access to Mission-Critical Data at All Times
Yet having such a plan remains unfinished business for many companies, perhaps due in part to the challenges of distinguishing the differences between business continuity and disaster recovery. While disaster recovery primarily involves protecting IT infrastructure and data from disabling events after an equipment or site failure, business continuity targets a more comprehensive, business-focused approach for maintaining the availability of mission-critical applications and data in the face of any type of disruption. Therefore, a successful business continuity plan delivers more than the ability to restore or recover data; it improves the company's financial performance by ensuring sustained workforce productivity and revenue generation.

It is equally important for an organization to devise both of these plans in conjunction as each, on its own, will not be able to provide the level of preparedness and protection today's businesses demand to remain up and running under any conditions. Simply put, the two go hand in hand.

Not Your Typical Expectations
Major disasters such as hurricanes, fires, terrorist attacks, earthquakes and tsunamis are not the only kinds of disasters that can cripple an organization. Executives sometimes overlook the often commonplace events such as cable cuts, power outages, computer viruses and equipment failures that can endanger a company's business survival. Not being prepared can result in unfavorable consequences.

Most organizations cite downtime and its impact on revenue generation as the major drivers creating demand for a comprehensive business continuity strategy. Among the most tangible consequences of service downtime, besides the adverse effect on revenues, is the derailment of everyday business systems that help organizations operate productively. Reportedly, carmaker Subaru calculated that the company loses $20,000 an hour on wages alone when its inventory tracking system is down. This realization shows the high degree of direct impact that not having a business continuity strategy can have on a company's bottom line.

While any interruption to revenue generation undeniably plays a major role in the need for business continuity, it is not the only factor that should be considered when analyzing the optimal business continuity approach. There are a variety of intangible costs that indirectly impact the bottom line, which all accelerate the growing demand for greater business resiliency.

The 'Closed Loop' Process
Arguably, the most important aspect in preparing any business continuity plan is validating the combined technology and business processes to ensure they work together seamlessly. This requires the diligent testing of the documented plan under many different types of circumstances.

It is important to measure and validate test results relative to the plan's original goals and priorities. The Business Continuity Institute suggests business continuity plans be tested fully at least once a year, yet research from Infoconomy revealed only one-third of companies surveyed do so. To improve these odds, organizations should implement a "closed loop" process for deploying and maintaining their business continuity strategies.

The "closed loop" process consists of the following steps:

  • Strategy definition
  • Plan execution
  • Validation and measurement
  • Investment maintenance

Organizations that are the most successful take time to quantify their requirements and continuously measure results against specified goals.

Test and Evaluate and Test Again
If weaknesses are exposed after testing and evaluation, it is imperative that the testers react quickly to implement necessary changes in prioritized fashion, through taking careful, calculated steps that consider both technology requirements and business needs. Be sure to communicate testing results as well as any subsequent changes to the entire organization. Then test and test again with continuous reviews and enhancements as the organization grows or changes. Pay particular attention to fluctuating business conditions as well as the addition of new technologies and applications.

Business continuity and disaster recovery should be thought of not as a task to be completed but as a living and breathing exercise. For any exercise to be worthwhile requires dedication, unwavering consistency and constant repetition. To create and maintain a business continuity plan that is a corporate must that necessitates a serious commitment of time and resources, making sure all systems and process analyses are performed and then remaining dedicated to supporting all the steps all along the way. Otherwise, the future of the business could be at stake.


Related Reading on Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning


About the Author

As the senior vice president of corporate development and strategy, Ken Horner is responsible for the worldwide roll out of BakBone's overall strategy and business development activities that will drive future growth for the Company, and the direct sales development, channel management activities and revenue growth in the North and South America regions. With 20 years of storage, networking, and enterprise software management experience, Ken spent six months as a corporate development consultant to BakBone before joining the Company in September 2005. Prior to BakBone, Ken was vice president of worldwide marketing and channel operations at DataCore Software. In this capacity, Ken spent four years successfully leading corporate partnering, worldwide market and multi-tiered channel definition, technology acquisition and strategic alliance efforts on a global basis. As part of Seagate Software's executive management team, Ken was instrumental in building and managing the Storage Management Group, including the development of the Backup Exec product line, from its inception (as Arcada Software) through its sale to VERITAS. Ken has also held senior management positions at Sterling Software, Tech Data Corporation, and Rexon/WangTek.

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